Bill Introduced To Give Copyright Office More Autonomy

Posted on 12/15/2015 by Jim Pickerell | Printable Version | Comments (0)

Congresswoman Judy Chu (CA-27), Congressman Tom Marino (PA-10) and Congresswoman Barbara Comstock (VA-10) have introduced H.R. 4241 – the Copyright Office for the Digital Economy Act or the CODE Act. This comes after months of discussion with various stakeholders, including several joint Member roundtables.

As a result, improvements were made to the bill which reflect a consensus across various industries and public interest groups since the discussion draft bill was released for comment in June. Among the new changes are:
  • Housing the Copyright Office in the Legislative Branch
  • Requiring ongoing technology studies to ensure the office remains current with technology to be more user friendly which includes improving upon the searchable database
  • The establishment of an advisory board representing a variety of interests and views tasked with providing the Office with candid feedback on the office current field of copyright to ensure neutrality and objectivity
  • Technical provisions to ensure a more seamless transition away from the Library of Congress
Congresswoman Chu said the following of the bill:

“I am proud to join Rep. Marino to introduce legislation that would modernize the Copyright Office. The copyright industries are responsible for millions of jobs and billions of dollars in our economy, yet the office responsible is running on analog in a digital world. Over the course of this year, we met with interested stakeholders to discuss the needs of the Copyright Office and the changes we must make to bring it into the modern age. I appreciate their participation and the feedback we received that helped shape this legislation. As a result, this bill would make operational improvements, provide budgetary control to the Copyright Office, and ensure that it has sound legal ground to perform its core mission. I look forward to continuing my work with colleagues and interested parties on the improvements needed to ensure that our country has a Copyright Office that reflects the 21st century.”

Congressman Marino said:

“Creativity is the essence that has made America the most prosperous nation in the world. However, we have allowed our Copyright Office to fall behind the fast-moving pace of America’s creators and the industries they work within, which hurts copyright holders as well as the public. This bill will ensure the Office has great autonomy to more quickly adapt to changes in technology and accessibility to ensure the public can enjoy the benefits of creative works while ensuring the artists get paid. We approached this effort thoroughly and sought the advice and feedback of everyone interested in copyright. This bill is well thought-out, reasonable and provides a long-term solution to the Copyright Office’s ailments. I am more than confident this proposal will garner more and more support as we move forward.”


Copyright © 2015 Jim Pickerell. The above article may not be copied, reproduced, excerpted or distributed in any manner without written permission from the author. All requests should be submitted to Selling Stock at 10319 Westlake Drive, Suite 162, Bethesda, MD 20817, phone 301-251-0720, e-mail: wvz@fpcubgbf.pbz

Jim Pickerell is founder of www.selling-stock.com, an online newsletter that publishes daily. He is also available for personal telephone consultations on pricing and other matters related to stock photography. He occasionally acts as an expert witness on matters related to stock photography. For his current curriculum vitae go to: http://www.jimpickerell.com/Curriculum-Vitae.aspx.  

Comments

Be the first to comment below.

Post Comment

You must log in to post comments.

Stay Connected

Sign up to receive our FREE weekly email listing new stories posted.

Follow Us

Free Stuff

2017 Stories Worth Reviewing
The following are links to some 2017 and early 2018 stories that might be worth reviewing as we move into the new year.
Read More
Stories Related To Stock Photo Pricing
The following are links to stories that deal with stock photo pricing trends. Probably the biggest problem the industry has faced in recent years has been the steady decline in prices for the use of ...
Read More
Stock Photo Prices: The Future
This story is FREE. Feel free to pass it along to anyone interested in licensing their work as stock photography. On October 23rd at the DMLA 2017 Conference in New York there will be a panel discuss...
Read More
Important Stock Photo Industry Issues
Here are links to recent stories that deal with three major issues for the stock photo industry – Revenue Growth Potential, Setting Bottom Line On Pricing and Future Production Sources.
Read More
Recent Stories – Summer 2016
If you’ve been shooting all summer and haven’t had time to keep up with your reading here are links to a few stories you might want to check out as we move into the fall. To begin, be sure to complet...
Read More
Corbis Acquisition by VCG/Getty Images
This story provides links to several stories that relate to the Visual China Group (VCG) acquisition of Corbis and the role Getty Images has been assigned in the transfer of Corbis assets to the Gett...
Read More
Finding The Right Image
Many think search will be solved with better Metadata. While metadata is important, there are limits to how far it can take the customer toward finding the right piece of content. This story provides...
Read More
Where Is The Stock Photo Industry Headed?
For new readers, or those who may have missed some of what I have written over the last few months, the following are a list of stories worth looking at to get a sense of where the industry is headed.
Read More
Photography As A Career
It’s that time of year when high school seniors are waiting for college acceptance letters and thinking about future careers. If you know someone who is thinking about photography as a career you mig...
Read More
2014 Stories You May Have Missed
For many the end of the year is a time to review past experiences and consider whether it makes sense to chart a new course in the year ahead. Stock photography has changed dramatically for professio...
Read More

More from Free Stuff