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Articles by Jim Pickerell

If I Were Adobe

By Jim Pickerell | 507 Words | Posted 1/30/2015 | Comments
Adobe’s acquisition of Fotolia is expected to close in February (second half of Adobe’s fiscal Q1 2015). Assuming everything goes well the next question on the minds of everyone in the stock photo industry is what will Adobe do with Fotolia and how will that affect the rest of the players.

Christina Vaughn New CEO Of CueSongs

By Jim Pickerell | 452 Words | Posted 1/30/2015 | Comments
CueSongs, the one-stop music licensing hub for online and digital media, is delighted to announce Christina Vaughan is taking up the position of CEO from the 1st of February. Christina will remain as Chairman of Image Source but will relinquish day to day operations of the business to Anthony Harris, who becomes Image Source’s CEO.

Dramatic Royalty Increase At VideoBlocks Marketplace

By Jim Pickerell | 644 Words | Posted 1/29/2015 | Comments
Image creators always want a higher royalty. How’s 100% of what the customer pays? At Videoblocks Marketplace that’s what contributor will receive when their HD and 4K video clips are used. Too good to be true? Read on.

Want To Sell More Pictures? Look Down!

By Jim Pickerell | 374 Words | Posted 1/26/2015 | Comments
Based on the searches they have been getting in the last few months Shutterstock has just released a new infographic on 2015 Creative Trends in the demand for still images, illustration and video clips. One of the interesting trends for photographers is that searches for “top view” have increased 66% in the past year.

Sports Illustrated Lays Off All Staff Photographers

By Jim Pickerell | 233 Words | Posted 1/26/2015 | Comments
Last week Sports Illustrated, one of the most photo oriented magazines in the world, laid off all six of its staff photographers. They included Robert Beck, Simon Bruty, Bill Frakes, David Klutho, John McDonough, and Al Tielemans. In the future all images in SI will be shot by freelancers, or the wire services.

Who Owns The Rights?

By Jim Pickerell | 747 Words | Posted 1/23/2015 | Comments (3)
Have you gotten tired of reading all the “terms and conditions” on the social media sites? Or have you just given up and assumed they are OK. If you really read (and understand) all the terms on these sites is there any time left to engage on the sites? Is there any time left to take pictures?

Pond5 Launches the Public Domain Project

By Jim Pickerell | 253 Words | Posted 1/22/2015 | Comments
Pond5 has announced today the launch of the Pond5 Public Domain Project, ( the first library of free public domain content designed specifically for media makers. The initial collection includes 10,000 video clips, 65,000 photos, thousands of sound recordings, and hundreds of 3D models.

Visual Connection To Stage Boston Visual Media Expo

By Jim Pickerell | 196 Words | Posted 1/22/2015 | Comments
Visual Connections, best known for its annual expo in New York, has added Boston to its schedule with a marketing event for stock image/footage agencies on Thursday, March 26th at the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School. The Boston Visual Media Expo will follow a similar format to previous popular and successful events in Chicago and Toronto.

Dreamstime Does Deal For Google Docs Templates

By Jim Pickerell | 437 Words | Posted 1/20/2015 | Comments
Dreamstime has been selected as a “beta provider of stock photos for Google display ads.” According to the explanation on the company’s online forum contributors will be paid roughly $2 per image selected during the “beta” license period which is 12 months.

The Power Of Buyers Who Are Also Sellers

By Jim Pickerell | 731 Words | Posted 1/19/2015 | Comments
In the next year image creators who are also image buyers may determine the future of stock photography. One-third or more of the images purchased may be bought by people who are also trying to sell their images. As buyers they want the lowest possible price. With their seller hat on they want the highest possible price.

About Jim Pickerell

Jim began his career in 1963 as a freelance photojournalist in the Far East. His first major sale, a Life Magazine cover, was a stock photo of the overthrow of the Ngo Dinh Diem government in Saigon, Vietnam.

He spent the next ten to fifteen years focusing on assignment work, first as an editorial photographer, and later in the corporate area. He regularly filed his outtakes with several stock agencies around the world.

As the stock side of his income grew, Jim studied the needs of the stock photo market, and began to devote more of his shooting time producing stock images. At about this time the 1976 change in the copyright law went into effect, and the industry began to see rapidly growing demand by commercial and advertising users for stock images.

In the early 80's he helped establish the Mid-Atlantic chapter of American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) and served as Vice President, President and Program Chairman over a period of six years. He served on the national board of ASMP for two years, was on the committee that produced the ASMP Stock Handbook in 1983, and was active in the fight to reverse the IRS rules that required capitalization of all expenses of stock photo production.

In 1989 he published the first edition of Negotiating Stock Photo Prices, a guide to pricing hundreds of stock photo uses. The fifth edition was published in 2001. In 1990, he began publishing Selling-Stock, a bi-monthly newsletter dealing with issues of interest to stock photographers and stock photo sellers, with particular focus on issues related to marketing stock images. Selling-Stock is recognized worldwide as the leading source of in-depth analysis of the stock photo industry. As a result of his many years in the industry and his work with Selling-Stock, Jim has an expert understanding of the stock photo industry, its standard practices and developing trends. He frequently provides consulting services on stock industry issues to photographers, stock agents and individuals in the investment community.

In 1993, his daughter, Cheryl, joined him in the business. Together they established Stock Connection, an agency designed to provide photographers with greater control over the promotion and marketing of their work than most other stock agencies were offering. The company currently represents selected images from more than 400 photographers.

At age 76, Jim continues to follow stock photo industry developments on a day to day basis and expects to continue to do so far into the future.