Articles by Jim Pickerell

ImageBrief And Mymarketplace Collection

By Jim Pickerell | 982 Words | Posted 2/10/2016 | Comments
It may be time for stock shooters to take another look at Image Brief. It started out as a place where customers would go to list a brief explaining the kind of imagery they needed for their next project.

Shutterstock Signs Exclusive Deal With BFA

By Jim Pickerell | 457 Words | Posted 2/9/2016 | Comments
Shutterstock, Inc. has announced an exclusive global syndication deal with BFA, a leading lifestyle, fashion, art and entertainment content creation agency. Over 1.7 million editorial images in the BFA collection will now be available to Shutterstock’s Premier customers, which include some of the largest marketing communications companies and publishing houses in the world.

Marketing Trends To Watch In 2016

By Jim Pickerell | 226 Words | Posted 2/8/2016 | Comments
Both Adobe and Shutterstock have recently posted information on tends they have spotted that they think will continue to build in 2016.

Adobe Stock Adds 100,000 4K Video Clips

By Jim Pickerell | 401 Words | Posted 2/5/2016 | Comments (2)
Adobe Stock has added over 100,000 4K video assets to its current collection of over one-million video assets. The site also offers over 45 million images and graphics. This story shows how that compares with other footage providers.

Visual Connections In Chicago

By Jim Pickerell | 256 Words | Posted 2/5/2016 | Comments
Visual Connections returns to Chicago on Thursday, May 5th to stage another networking and education event for art buyers and researchers who need images and footage. The venue will be the conveniently located Ivy Room at Tree Studios.

Reviewing Microstock

By Jim Pickerell | 890 Words | Posted 2/4/2016 | Comments
As microstock agencies race to grow their collections, there is an increasing demand for people to review submissions. Reviewers are expected to review 30,000 images a month, but according to one source the average tends to be around 40,000. Some of the more experienced are able to review close to twice the average.  

How Much Will Getty Benefit From Licensing Corbis Images?

By Jim Pickerell | 791 Words | Posted 2/3/2016 | Comments
In a previous story, I came to the conclusion that the Corbis properties VCG purchased probably generated in the range of $60 million in 2015. Does that mean that after experiencing steadily declining Premium and Midstock revenue for several quarters Getty is likely to have a $60 million increase in 2016? I think the answer is No. Here’s a dozen reasons why.

Fashion Photographers Beware

By Jim Pickerell | 208 Words | Posted 2/2/2016 | Comments
Fashion photographers beware! Much of your market is about to disappear. Why bother dealing with temperamental photographer and models when customers can hang the clothes on a mannequin and give the mannequin a human looking body and expression with Photoshop. That’s what Looklet is doing.

Want Higher Prices? Check Out Offset

By Jim Pickerell | 1535 Words | Posted 2/1/2016 | Comments (1)
If you’re a photographer who licenses your work as RM because you believe that’s the way to earn the most money (or a reasonable fee) when your pictures are used, it’s time to take a look at Offset. Many photographers are so opposed to microstock and subscription that they refuse to consider anything connected in any way with Shutterstock. If it is a Shutterstock initiative then it must be bad.

More On Corbis Sale

By Jim Pickerell | 941 Words | Posted 1/29/2016 | Comments (2)
The good news for Corbis photographers is that there will be no third cut before their royalty share is calculated. However, there are still a number of issues that aren’t clear. This story offers some additional clarifications and insights and a number of questions that are still unclear and need to be answered.

About Jim Pickerell

Jim began his career in 1963 as a freelance photojournalist in the Far East. His first major sale, a Life Magazine cover, was a stock photo of the overthrow of the Ngo Dinh Diem government in Saigon, Vietnam.

He spent the next ten to fifteen years focusing on assignment work, first as an editorial photographer, and later in the corporate area. He regularly filed his outtakes with several stock agencies around the world.

As the stock side of his income grew, Jim studied the needs of the stock photo market, and began to devote more of his shooting time producing stock images. At about this time the 1976 change in the copyright law went into effect, and the industry began to see rapidly growing demand by commercial and advertising users for stock images.

In the early 80's he helped establish the Mid-Atlantic chapter of American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) and served as Vice President, President and Program Chairman over a period of six years. He served on the national board of ASMP for two years, was on the committee that produced the ASMP Stock Handbook in 1983, and was active in the fight to reverse the IRS rules that required capitalization of all expenses of stock photo production.

In 1989 he published the first edition of Negotiating Stock Photo Prices, a guide to pricing hundreds of stock photo uses. The fifth edition was published in 2001. In 1990, he began publishing Selling-Stock, a bi-monthly newsletter dealing with issues of interest to stock photographers and stock photo sellers, with particular focus on issues related to marketing stock images. Selling-Stock is recognized worldwide as the leading source of in-depth analysis of the stock photo industry. As a result of his many years in the industry and his work with Selling-Stock, Jim has an expert understanding of the stock photo industry, its standard practices and developing trends. He frequently provides consulting services on stock industry issues to photographers, stock agents and individuals in the investment community.

In 1993, his daughter, Cheryl, joined him in the business. Together they established Stock Connection, an agency designed to provide photographers with greater control over the promotion and marketing of their work than most other stock agencies were offering. The company currently represents selected images from more than 400 photographers.

At age 76, Jim continues to follow stock photo industry developments on a day to day basis and expects to continue to do so far into the future.